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How Covid-19 will change the consumer buying behaviour

How Covid-19 will change the consumer buying behaviour

The author of today’s post is Irina Gujabidze.

A highly experienced professional marketer with extensive knowledge of the multi-faceted marketing world. Under her interesting article how we will change our behaviour after the Covid-19, you can find her full biography.

Massimo Usai

As social distancing becomes the new normal due to Covid-19, consumer habits are adapting in real-time to the new environment and circumstances.

By Irina Gujabidze

1. Familiarity and necessity still rules

The first noticeable pattern was all-around convenience, as we saw consumers go from brick and mortar to online shops.

Quite frankly queuing is never an option for consumers and the fear of contracting the virus led to this fast transition. Interestingly, before the coronavirus and the implementation of the lockdown, we saw a trend in healthier eating and the consumption of plant-based, vegetarian, and vegan food.

This surging market saw a fast decline. Stocked up grocery was of foods that would be described as ‘necessity’ and food that can provide much more energy and last longer. Contrastingly, stocked shelves consisted of vegan and plant-based foods.

With the change in economy and uncertainty around consumers’ jobs and income security, perhaps plant-based or vegan items became far too expensive and eventually, consumers decided to buy cheaper items in far larger quantities than they would. It’s fair to say consumers’ survival mode coupled with panic kicked in very quickly.

Photo by Anna Shvets on Pexels.com

2. Put yourself in the consumers’ shoes

Considering this is the first of a unique kind of crisis we have had, it has shown not many businesses were pandemic-proof and in particular, marketers have faced a challenging period.

With no historical data to work with, brands have had to think on their feet very quickly. Everyday essential brands had little to no change and their demand was maintained, while for those who weren’t essential products or services, keeping the same level of sales has proven to be a challenge.

Now that consumers are at home more and are spending more time on devices, brands can get to know their concerns, what they need or feel, which they can then use to customise and modify their product portfolio to suit them building a better relationship. Brands in the FMCG industry need to provide convenience such as products that make home cooking fun again, even for children, allowing families to maintain that social aspect.

3. Track the transition

Brands can partner up with market research companies and utilise extensive data.

Brands in the FMCG sector should have a relationship with retailers where they share their data generated around consumer buying behaviour.

This will help brands to understand their performances against the competition but more so to align themselves with the new customer’s needs. This will allow brands to implement changes to their product or service offerings.

4. Bring light to the consumer

It is inevitable that performance marketing metrics will suffer within businesses during the current pandemic, but this provides an opportunity for long-term brand building.

It is a no brainer that what consumers are missing most is socialising, and brands who can look to engage with the consumer on an emotional level will drive long-term value.

It is about being able to utilise your brands’ USP for the power of good.

As a result, these approaches can build on your brand awareness and better relationships. It is more important than ever to find positive aspects. Brands who can show both their products and the human side, provide a glimmer of hope and will leave a powerful ever-lasting impression to the consumer even post-pandemic.

It is uncertain whether consumers will be more or less brand loyal going forward. However, unattended retail will become popular, and what we do know is that brands who can maintain their purpose at the forefront will be able to maintain the trust of the consumers in the long term.


How Covid-19 will change the consumer buying behaviour


Irina Gujabidze
Irina Gujabidze

She attained multiple degrees, including a BA with distinction in Business Management at the University of Sunderland and a MA with distinction in Marketing at Brunel University London.

  • Irina’s strong academic background, and passion for her field, has also led her to be invited as a guest speaker at leading British universities, including Brunel University of London, Queen Mary’s University and Coventry University.
  • With over 10 years’ experience in her discipline, Irina has the expertise needed to execute proven marketing strategies to steer a new product development project from creation stage through to launch. She currently heads the marketing department for the “Whatever Brands” and is shaping the future direction and growth of the agency and its portfolio of brands, whilst cultivating invaluable business partnerships. 
  • Irina is a confident multilingual speaker with a broad understanding of cross-cultural behaviours which allows her to deliver consistently recognisable and targeted brand messaging within international campaigns. 
  • An avid learner and reader, Irina enjoys keeping up to date with fashion and marketing trends, regularly bringing exciting and innovative elements into her work. She also loves traveling and practises Yoga as her daily healthy routine


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